Concepts in Trauma Care

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Agenda

View Module 5: Spinal Cord Injuries on YouTube

12 Contact Hours | Course Length: 706 Minutes


The Biomechanics of Trauma 114 minutes
Module Description
Understanding the mechanism that causes a traumatic injury may help the healthcare provider better establish the types of injuries to anticipate and may partially guide both assessments and interventions. This lecture will review common types of falls, motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle and bicycle incidents and auto-versus-pedestrian incidents, comparing the injury patterns commonly associated with each. This module is rich with video examples of the various mechanisms of injuries discussed.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Differentiate injury patterns associated with frontal, side impact, rear impact and rollover motor vehicle collisions.
  2. Anticipate the types of injury patterns associated with road-bike and speed-bike collisions.
  3. Verbalize the components of Waddell's triad.
  4. Identify the height at which the risk for injury and death related to a fall increase.

Strategies in Shock Resuscitation
75 minutes
Module Description
Recent research has called into question the traditional practices associated with hypovolemic shock resuscitation. Based on this research, the strategies in caring for the patient with hypovolemic shock is shifting. This lecture focuses on four different resuscitation strategies currently employed, comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each of the four strategies.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. List four strategies currently being utilized when caring for the patient in hypovolemic state.
  2. Compare the advantages of the four strategies presented for treating the patient in hypovolemic shock.
  3. Compare the disadvantages of the four strategies presented for treating the patient in hypovolemic shock.
  4. Apply the concepts covered to choose an appropriate resuscitation strategy for several case studies presented.

Traumatic Brain Injuries
91 minutes
Module Description
Traumatic brain injury remains the leading cause of traumatic death. Care of the patient with a traumatic brain injury requires unique knowledge and skill sets. This lecture provides the learner with knowledge of the recognition, assessment and treatment of a patient with a traumatic brain injury.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Differentiate between signs of early and late intracranial pressure.
  2. Calculate a cerebral perfusion pressure.
  3. List the four components of neurological assessment.
  4. Evaluate physiological parameters to determine if interventions for a patient with a traumatic brain injury have been successful.

Maxillofacial and Ocular Injuries
71 minutes
Module Description
Maxillofacial trauma has far-reaching effects on trauma patients, potentially creating a negative impact on the airway and breathing mechanisms of the body, all five senses and the very identity of the individual. Maxillofacial trauma presents numerous challenges to the healthcare worker. This lecture will introduce the learner to various forms of maxillofacial and ocular trauma, provide an in-depth introduction into assessing patients and offer hints in the care of the patient with maxillofacial trauma.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. List at least one complication associated with fractures of each maxillofacial bone.
  2. Differentiate between anterior, middle and posterior fossa fractures based on presenting symptomology.
  3. Describe care of an avulsed tooth.
  4. Identify the meaning of abnormalities encountered during the assessment of a patient with maxillofacial trauma.

Spinal Cord Injuries
63 minutes
Module Description
Although spinal cord injuries are not as common as many other injuries associated with trauma, the effects that spinal cord injuries have on the patients who sustain them are some of the most devastating when compared with other body systems. This lecture looks at recommendations made by the consortium for spinal cord medicine in the care of the patient with a spinal cord injury, providing both recommendations for care as well as refuting some practices that are no longer considered “standard of care.”

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Differentiate a partial cord injury based on the description of the neurological deficits of the patients.
  2. List at least five signs and symptoms associated with spinal cord injuries.
  3. Define spinal shock.
  4. Explain the reason that methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Solu-Medrol) is no longer recommended when caring for patients with spinal cord injuries.

Injuries to the Chest and Abdomen
116 minutes
Module Description
Chest injuries sustained during a traumatic event are often occult and easily missed. This module will review common injuries of the chest, the symptoms of those injuries as well as treatment considerations for patients with chest injuries. Injuries covered will include soft tissue injuries, orthopedic injuries, pulmonary injuries, cardiac injuries and injuries to the great vessels. The organs of the abdomen are poorly protected and vulnerable to injury. This module will go organ by organ, identifying signs and symptoms of trauma as well as treatment considerations for trauma. Genitourinary injuries and abdominal compartment syndrome will also be discussed.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Describe the difference between rib fractures in pediatric, adult and geriatric patients.
  2. Describe the problem of a malfunctioning chest tube.
  3. Define commotio cordis.
  4. List the symptoms of aortic injuries.
  5. Differentiate between signs of liver, spleen and pancreatic trauma.
  6. Define the seat-belt sign.
  7. List at least three indications for surgical repair of renal trauma.
  8. Describe nursing care for a patient who develops abdominal compartment syndrome.

The Pediatric Patient
61 minutes
Module Description
Care of the traumatically injured child is not the same as care of the traumatically injured adult. The knowledge and skills required for this population are unique. This lecture is presented in an interactive format where the learner is given a physiological difference that is unique to the pediatric population and must determine how this would influence care of the child. Many tips and tricks are presented that will assist the participant to better care for children.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. List at least 10 differences between the pediatric and adult patient.
  2. Match at least 10 care implications to physiological differences in the pediatric population.
  3. Recognize abnormal vital signs based on child's age.
  4. List a developmental milestone for each pediatric age group.

The Pregnant Patient
54 minutes
Module Description
Very few patients strike more fear in the hearts of a trauma team than a traumatically injured pregnant patient. The pregnant patient differs greatly from the nonpregnant patient in her laboratory values, risks of injury and assessment parameters. Because of this, care of the pregnant patient must be tailored to her unique needs. This lecture will highlight these differences as well as introduce injuries unique to the pregnant patient and her unborn child.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Identify whether various laboratory values are increased, decreased or unchanged during pregnancy.
  2. Describe at least three unique considerations that must be implemented when assessing the pregnant patient.
  3. Identify the approximate gestation of a pregnancy based on fundal height.
  4. List at least three injuries that are unique to the pregnant patient and/or her fetus.

The Geriatric Patient
28 minutes
Module Description
As we age, our bodies change. This can affect the types of injuries that the elderly experience in trauma, how we assess this population and care considerations for this population. This lecture presents those concepts and does so by presenting physiological differences in the older adult and asking the participant to determine the care considerations of those differences.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. List at least 10 physiological changes associated with aging.
  2. Match at least 10 implications for assessment and care of the older adult based on physiological changes.
  3. Determine if a laboratory value would be increased, decreased or unchanged when comparing the older adult with their younger counterpart.

The Bariatric Patient
33 minutes
Module Description
It is well-publicized that the incidence of obesity in the developing world is growing annually. Anybody who cares for the traumatically injured patient is most certainly going to have to care for the overweight patient and likely an obese patient. This subset of the population presents with unique assessment and care needs that are presented and discussed in this lecture.

Module Learning Outcomes
This module prepares the learner to:
  1. Calculate a body mass index (BMI).
  2. List at least one factor that makes airway or intervention difficult in the overweight patient.
  3. List at least one factor that makes breathing assessment or intervention difficult in the overweight patient.
  4. List at least one factor that makes circulatory assessment or intervention difficult in the overweight patient.

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